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Thursday, February 23, 2017

The Leap: AAC by 18 months, 3 years later

This post is a 3-years-later follow up to my blog post AAC by 18 Months.

Yesterday morning I received a message reminding me that (exactly) three years ago, I shared this status on Facebook. 



Three years ago yesterday was when I decided to lock our modeling/play iPad into guided access and give it to Will, so that he could have his own talker.

He was 17 months old. His speech at the time was on track as a 17 month old---he had a bunch of word approximations (I have them written down somewhere), he would label and request objects, and he wasn’t combining words yet (again, typical for 17 months).

On 2/22/2014 I gave him a talker because he really wanted one. Because it was hard to keep him away from Maya’s talker, and because I thought that introducing him to AAC would deepen their relationship and communication . . . and because AAC is an important part of our family culture.

I also gave it to him because, at that point, I had been running my big mouth online for a few years. I had been shouting into the void that people needed to “provide robust AAC early!” I had argued with parents and professionals in online groups, and confidently declared that “AAC will NOT impede speech development!” and that “When speech becomes easier to access, it will be used!”

And now I had Will, 17 months old, in the adorable early stages of developing his speech, and I was about to put a screen in front of him (a screen! the horror!) and let him use that to communicate.

Guys . . . I was really scared. Like, pit-of-my-stomach, what-if-I’m-about-to-really-mess-up-as-a-mom, it’s-all-well-and-good-to-insist-this-won’t-cause-problems-but-this-is-my-kid’s-future-speech-we’re-talking-about scared. I-can-already-hear-friends-and-family-judging-me-for-giving-my-toddler-a-talking-device scared.

I wish that all professionals could try on this type of fear. With Maya, who had no speech, I ran into the world of AAC with open arms, thirsty to learn and buy and implement and immerse.  Deciding to give AAC to Will, and struggling with the emotions that were a part of that decision, allowed me to understand what the process is like for parents of children who have some speech and are being told that they should add AAC into the communication mix. The fear of losing speech, or slowing speech development, is huge. Parents agonize over all sorts of parenting decisions (If I hide vegetables in brownies will my kids ever learn to eat non-hidden vegetables? Will TV time stifle creativity? Will tricking my children into thinking it’s bedtime 30 minutes earlier tonight lead to trust issues?) . . . and those ones don’t carry potential consequences that feel so big.

I am an AAC parent-advocate. I have read a ton of AAC research. I’m heavily involved in AAC networks.

I struggled.

But I gave it to him.

And 3 years later, I can tell you what has happened as a result of that decision.
  • We were able to avoid many toddler tantrums related to not understanding our child’s early speech, because he could use AAC as a back-up, or as a way to give clues as to what he was thinking.
  • Will’s speech milestones (2 word combinations, sentences, questions, etc.) all occurred either on time or early.
  • He began speaking new word approximations after using those words on a talker (e.g., he may have found “blueberries” on the talker and used that button a lot for a few days, and then I’d hear him verbally producing a form of “blueberries”).
  • Will and Maya connected in new, deep, amazing ways. For her, Will reinforced that using a talker is just something that people do. For himself, he got to be like his big sister, whom he adores. They giggled together. She taught him how to find new things. He showed her things he wanted to talk about. They still, to this day, make up games about finding words or saying silly sentences.
  • As Will spoke more and words became more clear, he used those words on the talker less . . . just as I had said online (when speech is more easily accessible, it will be used).
  • Will became an expert in communication repair. He is the most multi-modal 4 year old communicator I’ve ever seen. If he’s saying a word unclearly or can’t remember a word, he will act it out, give amazing clues, tell us words that it sounds like, etc. When he was 2-3 (and so much speech is somewhat unintelligible) he used the talker for communication repair in clever, fantastic ways.
  • Will began reading at an age earlier than expected, which I believe is partially due to text exposure and keyboard use.
  • He uses the talker now the way that a child might use a dictionary for spelling---he’ll ask me how to spell a word to write down, but if I’m not quick he’ll grab a talker. Or he’ll start typing in the search feature and then check out spellings of multiple words.
  • His receptive and expressive language and vocabulary are very high (above 90th percentile at last measurement).

It is unlikely, therefore, that early introduction of AAC had any negative impact on his speech or language development.

It’s been good. Enlightening. Endearing and surprising. Stunning, sometimes. Silly and fun and inspiring, in ways. Amazing.

But that leap . . . it’s tough.

Parents, if you are considering AAC for a nonverbal or minimally verbal little one, but holding back because you’re scared, take the leap. Your child deserves the words, in whatever way they can access them right now. The research says that AAC will not impede speech or language development---it will actually support speech and language development as it provides your child with a voice.

Professionals, the fear is real. Parents may not be holding back because AAC is tough to learn, or difficult to logistically manage, or cumbersome, or unfamiliar. They might be really scared of making the “wrong” choice for their child---they might worry that providing AAC to a little one may seem like an easier way to access words right now, at the cost of risking long term speech development. It’s your job to create a supportive, open environment in which these discussions can be had, to acknowledge these (very real) fears, to provide information and support, and to help these families connect with other AAC families (online or in person).

The struggle is real.
The risk feels real.
The leap is big.
The rewards are kind of limitless.


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#AACfamily



9 comments:

  1. THAT is pretty darn awesome. I expect it's like hearing children of deaf adults, or children of bilingual adults - it's beneficial in every way people can measure, at very least by the time they're past early literacy. Also your pictures of your children together are adorable.

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  2. Fascinating reading your story! Thank you!

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  3. That is awesome. My typically developing child has a fine motor issue we have observed for some time now. We just had her preliminary OT evaluation done by EI (my son gets physical therapy through them) and the results suggested that she would benefit from occupational therapy sessions.

    My plan is to invest in a communication device so that she can use it to improve her small motor skills and communicate with us as well. Her speech is fine but she often does get frustrated when we ask her questions or have her repeat what she is saying. Plus it would allow her to work on her hand strength too. I also want my son to use it too.

    Tracy

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  5. نقل الأثاث الثقيل ليس بالأمر السهل على الإطلاق ، وحتى أقل من ذلك عندما يتعين عليك تحريكه لأعلى الدرج! سواء كنت تنتقل إلى منزل جديد في طابق أعلى في شقة لا تحتوي على مصعد أو تحتاج إلى نقل بعض الأثاث إلى طابق آخر في المنزل ، فمن المهم استخدام الأسلوب الصحيح للقيام بذلك بأمان. اتخذ بعض الإجراءات لحماية الأثاث ومنزلك ونفسك من التلف والإصابة قبل أن تبدأ في نقل أي شيء. احمل قطعًا كبيرة على الدرج باستخدام مساعد أو استخدم عربة لنقل القطع الثقيلة الصغيرة والمتوسطة الحجم بمفردك بينما يكتشفك شخص ما من الأسفل. استفد من المعدات والتقنيات المتخصصة لتسهيل رفع بعض العناصر ووضعها في مكانها.
    تقديم خدمة نقل الأثاث بأفضل خدمة وأقل تكلفة وأسرع وقت وملائم للعملاء لتنفيذ عملية نقل الأثاث وتوفير المال والوقت للعملاء. جميع خدمات شركتنا بمعنى الخدمات الشاملة.

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    نظافة المنزل تعتبر نظافة المنزل عاملاً أساسياً للصحة الجسدية والعقلية لأفرادها ، ولأن النظافة هي أساس الوقاية من الأمراض الناتجة عن تراكم الأوساخ والبكتيريا وتعكس صورة ونمط حياة صاحب المنزل ، تحتاج كل أسرة إلى إنشاء نظام للحفاظ على جميع تفاصيل المنزل والبقاء على اتصال مع جميع أفراد الأسرة
    يتم تنظيف المنزل لجعل المنزل يبدو أفضل ورائحته أكثر انتعاشا وأسهل للعيش فيه. بدون تنظيف المنزل، يمكن للجير أن يبني على الصنابير، وينمو العفن في المناطق الرطبة، وتظهر اللطخات على الأسطح الزجاجية، ويتكون الغبار على الأسطح، تفاعل الجراثيم يجعل سلال القمامة والمرحاض تفوح برائحة كريه وأنسجة العنكبوت تتراكم في الاسقف. الأدوات المستخدمة في تنظيف المنزل تشمل المكنسة الكهربائية والمكانس والمماسح والإسفنج، إلى جانب منتجات التنظيف مثل المنظفات والمطهرات المبيضات.
    أفضل شركة تنظيف منازل تقوم بتنظيف جميع انحاء المنزل حتى تجعله خالي من الاوساخ والاتربة ولان شركتنا مميزة فهي تقوم بتنظيف الاماكن الصعبة في المنزل حيث تستخدم أفضل معدات التنظيف وتمتلك عمالة مدربة
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